Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – March ’09


20090315_red-columbine

This newly planted Columbine may not survive in the garden because it isn’t a native, but I added it to encourage my native Columbines to bloom. You know, set an example or something. And I adore looking at it!
(Update: I discovered this species is called Winkie, or Winky, a heat-tolerant variety that has been shown to be hardy here in Central Texas over recent years. There is the possibility that it might be a perennial after all!)
20090315_columbine-yellow

I love the delicate flowers of the Columbine, and I’ve moved them into the new bed that I believe gives them appropriate sunshine and moisture; under a deciduous Cedar Elm so they can get a bit of winter sunshine and lots of summer shade. Perhaps next year’s blooms will be more prolific.

20090315-amethyst-flame

The Amethyst Flame Iris is still quite happy in her new home, with only 4-5 hours of sun during the winter. I’m surprised she has so many blooms, frankly.

20090315_white-lantana

I added this trailing lantana in a bright white to be groundcover in the bulb bed. I love the color, it’s such a true white. Difficult to photograph, though.

20090315_geranium

The Ivy Geranium recently pulled from her makeshift greenhouse winter home is happy in her usual place over the waterfall, where she gets constantly splashed lightly and has plenty of humidity, even in the drought.

20090315mountainlaurel

In the front yard, the Mountain Laurel blooms are winding down. It was a lovely year for the Mountain Laurels, despite the lack of winter rain.

20090315-lantana

I didn’t get this leggy trailing Lantana in purple trimmed back in time before it burst into bloom. I’ll let it have a nice bloom time, then trim it as the season heats up near summer to shape it up and help it bloom more. It’s part of my purple and yellow color scheme for the front yard.

20090315-bulbine

This Bulbine was moved into a new spot in the yard to get more sun. I’m creating a new bed around it, with plants that have yellow and orange blooms. Currently there is a Citrus Splash rose and a recently added yellow/orange Lantana. I plan to add a Pride of Barbados this year, and then perhaps an Agave for structure and contrast. I do like the silver blue of the Agave with the hot orange and yellow combination. It’s a slow work in progress.

20090315-amethyst-flame-close

Thanks to Carol, May Dreams Gardens, for sponsoring GBBD every month.

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27 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – March ’09

  1. Robin, I must have some of that iris now! I love that color. And, I, too love to experiment with the “exotic” columbines. They are so pretty. If they don’t come back, it was worth it for the fun. Lovely garden.

  2. I just learned about the Texas Mountain Laurel recently. It is quite an attractive shrub/tree.

  3. I thought our columbines were killed last year, when they seemed to die shortly after being put in, but I see little crowns of columbine leaves coming up where they were last year, so maybe they just needed to recover! Lovely colors there.

  4. I have totally fallen for the delightfully beautiful iris Amethyst Flame…All your blooms are fantastic…very nice photos. gail

  5. Linda, the Iris is quite something, isn’t it? I’ll bet Pam would be willing to raid her former home for more for you! If she’s out let me know and I’ll provide some in the fall. Your columbines that are blooming are exquisite, Linda, and it caused me to purchase more today, though the natives this time.

  6. I didn’t learn about Mountain Laurels while living in North Texas where I grew up, but moving to Austin it became as vital as an Oak tree to have in my yard. They are stunning in bloom, and the leaves are beautiful year round. Thanks for visiting on GBBD!

  7. I would love to have seen those huge columbines, Katie. I can’t imagine them being so tall, as ours here go dormant in the heat before they reach much height. I’ll bet they were breathtaking.

  8. Good luck, I hope you get blooms. Columbines are such a sweet plant, with such delicate coloring and leaves. It is surprisingly hardy, though, isn’t it?

  9. Gail, I have also fallen for this gorgeous and hardy Iris. And what a great name it has! Thanks for visiting, and I hope you begin to warm up soon.

  10. The flowers look great! You have more blooming now than I do, but that will come. I think the Dallas area is a couple of weeks behind the Austin area. Thanks for stopping by my blog again.

  11. Yes, Austin is definitely ahead of Big D in warm weather. I’m looking forward to seeing your blooms next month. I hope you join us in bloom day then!

  12. Gorgeous columbine. I have grown the hybrids before and they have been successful but not long lived. The yellow would take over the garden if given the chance but it is such a lovely flower.

  13. I would probably be happy if the yellow columbine took over the garden, Jenny. However, I haven’t had success with them for years now. I just planted several more in a new spot that hopefully they will like better. I’ll keep trying, because I really do love those flowers as well as the foliage.

  14. Pingback: If you build it, it will come « Getting Grounded

  15. MSS, thanks for visiting. That post was from a month or so ago – the mountain laurel stopped blooming at least two weeks ago. As did the Winkie – but I love it, too. I hope it stays with me at least for another year or two. Your bloom day post is absolutely amazing right now.

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